Recent Coverage


Board member of anti-racism agency fired amid accusations of Islamophobic commentary

By Jennifer Yang Toronto Star | December 21, 2017 A board member with the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, an arms-length federal government agency established to counteract racism, has been fired amid concerns over what Muslim advocacy groups describe as “Islamophobic commentary” and her “public association with purveyors of hateful propaganda.” Christine Douglass-Williams has been a board member since 2012 and her dismissal was confirmed on Wednesday to foundation chairperson Albert Lo. He said he was notified by the Department of Canadian Heritage, ...

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TVA apologizes for mosque story, says it will investigate ‘journalistic process’

By René Bruemmer Montreal Gazette | December 15, 2017 The TVA news network apologized Friday for a controversial and since debunked report on mosques banning women from a nearby construction site, but a national Muslim organization says the network needs to go further. At the mosques Friday, worshippers filled the halls and leaders praised the government and other media for their quick work to bring out the truth, but many said the damage wrought by the news report had already been done, once again stirring anti-Muslim sentiment and bringing fear and a sense of ...

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Intelligence reform needed to rebuild confidence, Muslim group tells MPs

By Jim Bronskill Canadian Press | December 12, 2017 OTTAWA — Reform of national security agencies — not just more oversight and review — is needed to rebuild confidence and trust, a national Muslim group says. The National Council of Canadian Muslims told MPs studying the Liberal government’s wide-ranging national security bill Tuesday that new watchdog powers won’t fix the “culture of impunity” and systemic ills within Canadian security agencies. The council’s executive director, Ihsaan Gardee, said the bill strengthens the security establishm...

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Quebec judge stays controversial face-cover law Bill 62

By Ingrid Peritz The Globe & Mail | December 1, 2017 A judge has suspended Quebec's requirement that people show their faces to obtain public services, dealing the province's controversial "religious neutrality" law its first legal setback. The Superior Court ruling on Friday means that, for now, people in Quebec who wear the Muslim niqab can continue accessing services such as taking the bus or borrowing a library book without showing their faces. Since the adoption of Bill 62 by the Quebec National Assembly in October, it has been illegal for anyone in the ...

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Uber Canada’s service animal policy criticized by some disability rights advocates

By Peter Goffin November 20, 2017 | The Canadian Press TORONTO - Uber Canada has launched a new policy on how its drivers deal with customers who have service animals, but some disability rights advocates say exemptions built into the rules could still lead to discrimination. The company's policy says drivers who refuse to give rides to customers with service animals will be dismissed. But drivers could get an exemption if they provide Uber with "written evidence, like a doctor's or cleric's letter ... confirming that they belong to a group protected by human ...

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Bill 62 being challenged in court

CTV News | November 7, 2017 A legal challenge to Quebec's legislation banning face coverings has been filed. The National Council of Canadian Muslims and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association are challenging Bill 62 as a violation of the constitution. The Muslim woman challenging the lawsuit, Marie-Michelle Lacoste, argues that the law which is supposed to provide a level playing field for religious neutrality, actually creates a difficult burden for those who wish to abide by the tenets of their religion. Her lawyers are asking for the courts to block ...

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Quebec’s face-covering law heads for constitutional challenge

These violations cannot be justified in Quebec's free and democratic society,' plaintiffs say By Benjamin Shingler CBC News | November 7, 2017 Civil liberties advocates have launched a legal challenge over the constitutionality of Quebec's face-covering ban, arguing it "directly infringes on the freedom of religion of individuals." The law passed last month requires people to uncover their face to receive public services under certain circumstances. The legal challenge, filed Tuesday in Quebec Superior Court, contests a section of the province's religious ...

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Nine months after mosque killings, Quebec Muslims still waiting for promised change

By Graeme Hamilton National Post | October 20, 2017 MONTREAL — After a gunman killed six worshippers inside a Quebec City mosque in January, the outpouring of support for the Muslim community was immediate. The attack would be “a turning point” in the strained relationship between Quebec and its Muslim minority, Premier Philippe Couillard promised. “Let us think about Quebecers of the Muslim faith, our fellow citizens,” Couillard said at a vigil the night after the attack. “It must be said again: We are all Quebecers. The whole world is watching us.”...

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Women are tweeting scarf selfies to condemn Quebec’s Bill 62

By Natalie Stechyson Huffington Post Canada | October 19, 2017 As a new Quebec law that will force Muslim women to uncover their faces before they can ride the bus is being denounced by human rights groups and politicians, a handful of Canadian women are posting pointed selfies to show their own condemnation. The Quebec government passed Bill 62 Wednesday, which bans Muslim women who wear a niqab or burqa from obtaining government services — including public transportation — without showing their faces. The bill infringes on the religious freedom of Quebecers, ...

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Quebec passes bill banning niqab, burka while receiving public services

By Graeme Hamilton National Post | October 18, 2017 MONTREAL – Niqab-wearing Quebec women who want to ride the bus, visit the library, go for a medical check-up or meet with their child’s teacher are now legally required to uncover their faces while receiving provincial and municipal government services. Quebec’s National Assembly adopted Bill 62 Wednesday morning, a controversial law that is the Liberal government’s answer to a decade-long debate over the accommodation of religious minorities in the province. The bill passed despite opposition from the ...

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